Everybody Lies: Big Data, State Secrets, And The Secret Congressional Record

everybody lies big data

Everybody Lies: Big Data, State Secrets, And The Secret Congressional Record

Everybody Lies: Big Data, the New Maths, and America’s Truth About Everything is written by Steve Krogstad. The book is about a revolutionary new approach to understanding the human mind and brain, forever changing the way we look at ourselves, the way we interact with others and the way we judge the world. This book is literally about a new century of learning the truth about everything. Everyone Lies covers all the big issues that confront our society today, from lying to cheating, from cover-ups to crimes, from politics to spying and from war to peace – in short, everything is fair game in this new millennium.

Everybody Lies: Big Data, the New Maths, and America’s Truth About Everything by Steve Davidowitz and Jonathan Epstein teaches you how to uncover the truth about almost everything in your life, from your personal life to your business life, from your sex life to your job. This book takes into account the use of big data and the use of mathematical algorithms to crunch it into meaningful information that you can learn. Most importantly, it shows you how to apply this new math to your everyday life to help you win the game of success.

Everyone Lies: Big Data, the New Maths, and America’s Truth About Everything shows us what lies are and that some lies are bigger than others. For example, there is a well-known internet myth known as “self-induced abortion”. This myth suggests that women deliberately bring on their pregnancies in order to get an easy birth and thus avoid having to go through a painful labor. The author examines this example using big data and suggests that this method may indeed work. In fact, he points out, there have been a number of cases where women have made purposely induced abortions to give themselves enough time to give birth to their babies. However, this technique may not work for many women because they would not be able to get pregnant after self-induced abortion because of a lack of conception ability.

The Obama Family Tree by STEPhens-Davidowitz also uses big data in its investigation of the Obama Administration. It compares the relationship between the President’s closest staffers and Michelle Obama’s family. The book’s methodology pulls no punches, even going so far as to compare Malia Obama with her real mother. The authors point out that when comparing biological twins, there is a strong genetic factor that favors resemblance to their maternal family member.

Everybody Lies: Big Data, the New Maths, and America’s Truth About Everything analyze every part of Barack Obama’s life, his mother’s life, his work, and his political career. The book starts with a story about Barack Obama’s grandmother, who was a maid. Then, it moves on to present day Obama and his mother’s relationship, which have an interesting subplot involving the first lady’s grandmother. The book then goes into the official datasets that are now available for the study of genealogy, using census records. The book then presents some of the most striking results thus far from the official datasets. For example, they find evidence that Obama had relatives of White ethnic background in three of his maternal grandparents’ households, in addition to his two stepmothers.

David Lyon, the author of Everybody Lies: Big Data, the New Maths, and America’s Truth About Everything, offer statistical proof that the data on which his statistical analyses are based indeed support this claim. In addition, there is new evidence that the Obama Administration did not respond appropriately to concerns regarding HMO’s contracting out medical services to low income communities. The final chapter looks at the new math textbooks being marketed by publishers such as Princeton and Harvard that use a statistical approach called Bayesian statistics in their approach. David Lyon states that it will be up to the public to use these new methods in order to solve problems of high unemployment, economic decline, and increasing wealth gaps.

Everyone Loves Money is a quick read with excellent statistics and abundant examples. It was not my favourite book of the year but it was still a great read and recommended to other statisticians, ethicists, researchers, students, and executives. It also contains one of the best summaries on why data analysis is important in today’s business environment and why using randomised controlled trials is superior to using observational methods. Also in this book, Lyon offers his own brand of economics, namely “behavioural economics”. I found this very interesting and it is an excellent addition to any serious student’s library.

Overall, this was an enjoyable read that presented several topics on public policy with statistical support. I enjoyed the discussions and learnt a lot. The biggest lesson I took away from this read was the importance of using statistical methods in order to make sound public policy decisions. Hopefully, future studies will develop better ways to tackle our national challenges.